Advanced Microscopy and Immunochemistry

Axon Initial Segments in the Mouse Cortex.

Neurons in the rat flocculus. False colours image. Dr VC Wimmer

Virus-mediated expression GABA receptor subunit gamma2 (green), pre-synaptic inhibitory terminals (blue) and axon initial segments (red) in the hippocampus. Dr VC Wimmer

Neurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse. All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue). Confocal mosaic scan. V. Wimmer

Axon initial segments in the mouse cortex.

Neurons in the rat flocculus. False colours image. Dr VC Wimmer.

Virus-mediated expression GABA receptor subunit gamma2 (green), pre-synaptic inhibitory terminals (blue) and axon initial segments (red) in the hippocampus. Dr VC Wimmer.

Neurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse. All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue).  Confocal mosaic scan. V. Wimmer.

Astrocyte (GFAP; green) association with blood vessels (RECA; red) in the rat brain stem. Nuclei labaled using DAPI (blue)

Newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of an adult MT/MG NestinCreERT2 mouse

Coronal section from mouse brain stained for neurons using NeuN DAB histochemistry. Dr Kay L Richards

Dentate gyrus neurons expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse.  All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue). V. Wimmer

Astrocyte (GFAP; green) association with blood vessels (RECA; red) in the rat brain stem. Nuclei labaled using DAPI (blue).

Newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of an adult MT/MG NestinCreERT2 mouse.

Coronal section from mouse brain stained for neurons using NeuN DAB histochemistry. Dr Kay L Richards.

Dentate gyrus neurons expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse.  All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue). V. Wimmer.

Purkinje cells in the cerebellum (green), inhibitory pre-synaptic contacts (red) and axon initial segments (blue). Dr VC Wimmer

Optic nerve labelled with DAPI (blue), YFP (green) and CC-1, a marker of mature oligodendrocytes (red).

Bundle of axons in the auditory brainstem of a rat. Maximum projection of a false colour stack. Dr VC Wimmer

Neurons in the olfactory bulb expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse. All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue). Confocal mosaic scan. V. Wimmer

Purkinje cells in the cerebellum (green), inhibitory pre-synaptic contacts (red) and axon initial segments (blue). Dr VC Wimmer.

Optic nerve labelled with DAPI (blue), YFP (green) and CC-1, a marker of mature oligodendrocytes (red).

Bundle of axons in the auditory brainstem of a rat. Maximum projection of a false colour stack. Dr VC Wimmer.

Neurons in the olfactory bulb expressing EGFP in an EMXcre x ZEG mouse. All neurons (red) and inhibitory neurons (blue). Confocal mosaic scan. V. Wimmer.

 


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Services

Hours: 9am to 1pm Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 9am to 5pm Fridays

The Advanced Microscopy and Immunochemistry Facility (AMIF) is a joint Florey and University of Melbourne facility that supports in-house scientists and visitors in using light microscopy methods for their research.

We also regularly organise in-house and international courses to teach basic and advanced light microscopy methods.

The AMIF presently manages 10 state of the art microscope systems from leading companies. Several workstations for image analysis are provided.
The AMIF provides access to:

3 confocal microscopes (Zeiss LSM 780, Leica TCS SP8 and Olympus FV1000)
Inverted live cell imaging microscope (Olympus disc spinning unit; widefield fluorescence imaging)
5 stereology workstations (brightfield and fluorescence, Stereoinvestigator and Neurolucida)
Dissecting microscope
MCID
3 Image Analysis Workstations (Amira, Metamorph, Image-Pro Plus, ImageJ)
Server-based deconvolution (Huygens core)

The experienced microscopy team can assist users throughout the entire process of microscopic imaging: planning of an experiment, sample preparation, selection and usage of the microscope, image processing and visualisation, data transfer and storage.
All users of microscopy equipment need to be trained or demonstrate competence before access is permitted. Contact the platform to arrange training and platform induction.

Microscopes

We are passionate about quantitative imaging and the AMIF provides both state-of-the-art equipment and know how to quantify any aspect of your sample, from volume of structures of interest to number of neurons, synaptic contacts, neurite lengths and connectivity to co-localisation and dynamic processes in live cells. We provide server-based deconvolution using Huygens deconvolution software (SVI) to increase resolution and contrast, decrease noise and correct artefacts such as chromatic shifts, crosstalk and object movement.
 

Download Microscopes PDF Booklet

Access

To use the microscopes within the AMIF you will need an account for our ARIN booking system and arrange for a training session on the piece of equipment you would like to work with. Detailed instructions on how to get an account and receive training are below.
If you have any questions, contact Verena Wimmer.

Accessing ARIN Booklet