Florey Events

Posted on 12/05/2016

Motor Neurone Disease and the missing gene

Bookings

Following on from the success of the initial series last year, the Florey and Melbourne City U3A are again joining forces to bring the latest news on neuroscience to you.

This year’s series sees the return of some of the most popular speakers beginning with Florey Director and international leader in stroke researcher, Prof Geoffrey Donnan AO. New to the series will be some of the Florey’s brightest younger researchers.

All lectures except October 4 will be held at the Florey, 30 Royal Parade at 11 am.  Lectures will run for 45 minutes followed by a Q & A of 30 minutes.

 


 

Dr Bradley Turner is a molecular biologist and neuroscientist who trained at the University of Melbourne and University of Oxford and has been researching MND for over a decade. Dr Turner leads the Florey’s bright and enthusiastic team researching the causes of MND. Their mission is to discover effective treatments and a cure for Motor Neurone Disease, a cruel and always fatal disease. It progressively takes all muscle control from its victims while their minds remain alert and active. Dr Turner is making important gains in our understanding of the disease. Dr Turner and his team have significantly increased the lifespan of mice with motor neurone disease through a new gene therapy that seeks out ­affected cells and refills them with the missing gene. Their findings could also benefit young people with the childhood form of MND called spinal muscular atrophy.

Getting here

By Car:

Car parking, including disability parking, is available under the building with easy access to the auditorium/offices. ($12 for first 4 hours, $25 for more than 4 hours, $8 after 5pm).  We recommend you bring some gold coins to pay for your parking ticket. It is a pay and display system.

Street parking (also paid) is available but can be limited in this area.

By Public transport:

Tram 19, Stop 11 heading away from the city to the Kenneth Myer Building (opposite Royal Melbourne Hospital). Look for the Dr Dax cafe sign and you’ll know you’re there.

Tags: Lecture/Symposium