Imaging

Neuroimaging is an extraordinarily important neuroscience discipline, and is unique in being able to provide direct in vivo measurements of the human brain. This is of crucial importance in research into the causes of brain and mind diseases. 

Neuroimaging and MRI development

The MRI development group has a long-standing interest in translational research, linking the development of MRI techniques to important clinical and neuroscientific applications.

Our researchers continue to develop new methods for blood flow and diffusion imaging. The Neuroimaging group has achieved some of the most accurate and robust measures of blood flow in the brain and head, and white matter fibre tracking (ie visualising how the brain is inter-connected via a network of white matter fibre tracts).

In particular, the group has devised a novel solution to fibre tracking throughout the brain (Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD)), and has developed a software package (MRtrix) to apply this method. The technology has been made freely available to the neuroimaging research community and has been downloaded over 1000 times since its release.

The group is investigating a range of neurological and neuroscientific problems primarily in the areas of epilepsy and stroke. The MRI development and application work forms a core part of a current $12m NHMRC Epilepsy Program Grant.

Neuroimaging and Neuroinformatics

Neuroimaging is an extraordinarily important neuroscience discipline, and is unique in being able to provide direct in vivo measurements of the human brain. This is of crucial importance in research into the causes of brain and mind diseases.

The Neuroimaging and Neuroinformatics group utilises MRI in four major neuroscience research areas:

  1. The assessment of the structural and functional integrity of neural pathways in neurological disorders including Multiple Sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and Friedreich’s ataxia;
  2. Investigation of brain function including the neural base of thirst, pain and cough in normal human subjects;
  3. Development of advanced neuroimaging methodologies to enable novel in vivo measurements, such as quantification of iron metabolism in neurodegenerative diseases, and
  4. Implementation of data management systems for high throughput analyses

Visit the research division for Imaging.